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Leptospirosis outbreak in Southern Tanzania: Should we be concerned?

Published:January 11, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idh.2022.12.003

      Highlights

      • This paper is about the outbreak of Leptospirosis in Southern Tanzania.
      • Contamination of water systems with urine from infected livestock may be responsible for this outbreak.
      • To alleviate this outbreak, adequate education on the symptoms and prevention including effective sanitation strategies should be provided to the Tanzanians.

      Keywords

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