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Efficacy and safety of commercialized fecal microbiota transplant for the treatment of recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection

      Highlights

      • Commercialized fecal microbiota transplant (cFMT) is an effective and safe therapy for recurrent CDI.
      • Cure rates with oral cFMT and colonoscopy were found to be over 80%.
      • There were no serious adverse events reported as a result of cFMT.

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